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FAQ

Q: How does the Ortho-K slow the progression of childhood myopia.
A: It has been concluded in many studies that orthokeratology will halt or slow down the increase of axial length of the eye which is directly correlated to halting or slowing down progression of myopia.

Q: Who can wear ortho-k lenses?
A: People who suffer from nearsightedness will benefit the most from CRT, especially if your eye doctor does not recommend refractive surgery. Patients of any age can benefit from this treatment. Corneal reshaping lenses are especially useful for people who find eyeglasses and contact lenses inconvenient for various reasons. Some people find contacts hard to wear for an entire day, or don’t want to wear them while playing sports.People who suffer from dry eye syndrome or allergies have a hard time wearing contacts. Ortho-k is a perfect solution for anyone who can’t wear contact lenses, and don’t like the look or feel of eyeglasses.

Q: When will the ortho-k lenses start working?
A: After one or two nights of wearing the lenses, you will notice that your vision has improved. It could take a bit longer to reach perfect vision. Most people report achieving clear and sharp vision within two weeks. FDA trials have shown that approximately 65% of all patients who use CRT achieve 20/20 visual acuity.

Q: What is Vision Therapy?
A: Vision therapy is an individualized treatment plan prescribed by a Doctor of Optometry. It is used to treat eye conditions, such as strabismus (eye turn) or amblyopia (“lazy eye”). Through Vision Therapy, a Doctor of Optometry also teaches, improves and/or reinforces important visual skills, such as eye tracking, eye focusing and eye teaming abilities. Without these visual skills, simple tasks like reading or copying notes from the board become difficult. Skipping words or lines while reading, using a finger while reading, blurry near vision, double vision, eyestrain and/or eye fatigue are also common symptoms.

Q: What is “Low Vision”?
A: The term “low vision” refers to partial sight that cannot be corrected with surgery, drugs, eyeglasses, or contact lenses. The condition can range from having unsatisfactory vision to being nearly blind. The causes of low vision include eye injury, diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and heredity. As a result of reduced visual acuity or decreased contrast sensitivity, low-vision individuals may be unable to fully distinguish colors, see contrasts, or determine spatial relationships among objects. Fortunately, there are a variety of devices and strategies available for helping people with low vision overcome vision loss and live independently.